Porsche Repair Oh my! RennsportKC

It’s been awhile again, I made the huge mistake of allowing my lenovo auto update program to run, which in turn killed my internet connection system. After fighting it for a few days, I am now in the complete machine reload phase. Thus a lot of pictures of projects I had to blog about are going to bite it and I will start fresh with a better attitude. I have a history of putting my fist through computer screens when they don’t work right, so I am trying to remember to breath. In fact, I think Val’s computer that I am typing on right now was a result of a fit of anger I had with her past computer.

Had a good quiet day at the shop today which seems to be rare these days! I like the days where I can just start tearing into projects without any distractions, I can really get a lot done.
Bookwork: Check
993 Stage II exhaust modification: Check
951 Clutch Removal: Check
Jaguar Tire repair/TPMS replacement: Check
993 to alignment: Check
951 flywheel to machine shop: Check
Lunch: Check

Started out innocent enough today: I figured I would tear into the 86 951 for a clutch job, timing belt/waterpump job. The car had also had a really bad bounce to the rear end, we figured the coilovers that were installed needed a rebuilding. Once in the air though, I found that the coilovers (brand I have no idea, probably proform or something odd like that) were adjustable and were set on full soft. Tightened those babies down, so hopefully that will solve the issue.

This is a really nice looking 951 with some great fantastic upgrades including DME tuning, fabspeed exhaust, tial wastegate, fikse wheels, etc, but the further I got into the job, I realized that we have some neglected maintenance to catch up on 🙂

Transaxle is pretty oily, so while I have it out, I will clean it up and reseal it.

I nicknamed this car the Exxon Valdez. I think it is really #1 or #2, but to me it is the Valdez. Lots of oil leaks to take care of 🙂

One thing I noticed was that someone installed the front sway bar upside down. It isn’t suppose to hit the tie rod ends, lol.

Another thing on the list is to replace the puking power steering rack.

More oil! It appears most of the money was put into upgrades on this car, and not upKEEP. That’s ok, it will be in tip top shape when she leaves!

Few kinked vacuum lines here and there.

Yuck!

Even worse! Not a big deal though while it is out.

And of course this car has a 1 piece crossover pipe, so the intake and such needs to come off to pull that off so the bellhousing can be removed. Grrrr. It won’t have a one piece for long! But after battling some rusty fasteners, I have the clutch out in not so record time.

With the flywheel off, I have a little oil to clean up.

Time to replace the rear main seal. Using special tool something.123ab, I push the new RMS into place. Someone had been in here at some point and used some sort of sealant material around the outside of the RMS which left a really hard to clean surface on the girdle. I decided it was best to use a little aircraft permatex on the outer edge to make sure it seals up correctly. Normally I like to put these in completely dry.

And the new seal in place. Tomorrow will be a lot of cleaning and hopefully the clutch can go back together and reseal the transaxle.

With that stuff out of the way, I was able to tackle a 993 stage II muffler modification. One of my favorite exhaust mods that sounds absolutely fantastic on a 993. And for $275, it sure beats the price of aftermarket cans!

First I start with the cans out of the car. The idea is to create a bypass on the muffler where some of the exhaust can slip by the main muffler, giving the car the sound it should have had from the factory.

After mocking up my stainless steel center bypass pipe length, I use the plasma cutter to lop a couple of holes in the exhaust pipes.

And weld the new pipes in place and cover with some high temp VHT.

With those back on the car, I was able to move on to the jaguar. This car is so fast it is hard to get a picture of.

The car had a bad TPMS sensor which caused a leak, allowing the tire to go flat. A while of driving on a flat tire ruined the tire, so we replaced that as well.

After that was done it was time for lunch. Then a trip to take the 993 for alignment, a stop at the the tool guy to look at his wares, back to the shop, to the machine shop, then time to go home and blog!

And since I am on the subject of reloading computers which tends to raise my blood pressure, I am
reminded of the Honey Badger…..he just doesn’t give a $#@!

The honey badger is in the shop right now for some quick upgrades for it’s new owner. Oh don’t get me wrong, you don’t own the honey badger, the honey badger owns you.

First thing we had to get rid of was the super skinny kirky seat that you jammed your tail bone on every time you tried to get in the car. We replaced it with a fiberglass OMP seat, but had to remount the sliders, etc to make the seat fit.

With the seat in place, next up was to install a quick release hub. Using Rothsports system along with a momo wheel, we now have one of the best quick releases out there. Super easy to use, no guesswork trying to figure out where the wheel clicks in at.

A new set of 6 point harnesses and the Honey Badger is ready to go terrorize some cars!

Some quick facts about the Honey Badger:
The dinosaurs pissed off the Honey Badger once…….ONCE.
The Honey Badger already ate what the Rock was cooking.
When the Honey Badger enters a room, the room leaves.
The Honey Badger doesn’t break your bones, he turns them to dust.
You have $5, the Honey Badger has $3. The Honey Badger has more money than you.
The only time the Honey Badger has lost a fight was never.

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Valerie

January 7, 2013 at 8:46 PM

The only thing that would make this blog post better is if you were blogging in the Honey Badger Don’t Give a $?@& sweatshirt and I managed to get a picture while that was happening.
Also, give your computer to Honey Badger, it will be so scared it will run right instantaneously!

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